Open Market

Germany is an open market and warmly welcomes foreign investors. That is demonstrated by the 22,000 foreign enterprises that have established businesses in Germany and now employ more than 2.7 million people. The German market is open to entrepreneurial investment in practically all areas.

International Location

More than 7 million foreigners live in Germany. Several metropolitan regions have prominent foreign communities with their own schools, churches, shops, and restaurants. 70%+ of German blue- and white-collar workers can speak English

Qualified Personnel

Germany offers an exceptionally well-qualified, motivated and conscientious workforce. German employees’ high standard of knowledge and skills is internationally recognized. The demand for professionals is met by 383 institutions of higher education.

High Level of Innovation

Statistically, Germany has 277 international patents per one million inhabitants – more than anywhere else in the world. The close cooperation between industry and world-famous research institutions like the Max Planck and Fraunhofer Institutes swiftly transforms new ideas into products for the world market.

Developed Infrastructure

Germany has a closely knit network of roads, railways and international airports. That guarantees swift connections. The airport in Frankfurt is an international hub. The Port of Hamburg is one of largest container transshipment centers in Europe.

Legal Security

Germany is a modern constitutional state with transparent and reasonable laws. The advantages are internationally recognized. The German legal system has served as a model for legal systems in many other countries. International studies demonstrate that German legal security is highly regarded by investors. Among all countries, Germany ranks fourth in terms of legal security.

#1 in Best Countries Ranking

The World Bank LPI is an interactive benchmarking tool created to help countries identify the challenges and opportunities they face in their performance on trade logistics and what they can do to improve their performance. The LPI 2016 allows for comparisons across 160 countries – Source: http://lpi.worldbank.org/international/global

Germany ranks 1.st in the global Logistics Performance Index 2016

Germany, the most populous nation in the European Union, possesses one of the largest economies in the world and has seen its role in the international community grow steadily since reunification. The Central European country borders nine nations, and its landscape varies, from the northern plains that reach to the North and Baltic seas to the Bavarian Alps in the south. Germany employs a social market economy – open-market capitalism that also carries certain social service guarantees. Its economy is one of the world’s largest and Germany is one of the globe’s leading importers and exporters. Services, which include industries such as telecommunications, healthcare, and tourism, contribute the greatest amount to the country’s economy.

German Economy

For decades, Germany has been a country with a highly developed, high-cost, economy. The opportunities – but also the risks – of a German investment are therefore numerous, real and calculable. On the positive side, Business in Germany offers the foreign investor exciting national and international marketing and business perspectives. These are inextricably linked to the long-standing commitment to European integration and the traditionally strong business and cultural ties to most other European countries. The cultured, highly trained and educated working population provides the medium for turning these perspectives to practical advantage.

The downside to this is that costs – and especially employment costs – when measured in terms of wage rates, social security and other charges levied on employers – are comparatively high. Investment success in Germany is thus dependent on a carefully planned, sophisticated operation. In this sense, Business in Germany is very much an “up-market” country.

The German investment climate, both inward and outward, is both open and complex. The worldwide economic turbulences have now made it volatile as well. The government has embarked on a massive stabilization program to fend off the worst of the recession and there are encouraging signs of a return to lasting growth. Nevertheless, an investment today still rewards those with a carefully considered investment structure.

German Geography

The German population is currently estimated at 82m. A full census has not been taken since 1987 (1981 in the eastern part of the country), and population trends since have been based on estimates supported by a continual micro-census. The next full census is planned for 2011 as part of an EU-wide project. In contrast to other western European countries, the population has risen over the past decade due to immigration, which up to now has generally more than compensated for the excess of deaths over live births. However, this trend has now ceased and the general assumption is that of a long-term movement towards a reduced and aging population: official estimates suggest that the population will fall to between 65 and 70 million by 2060 – depending on immigration levels.

Germany is more densely populated than either of her two largest neighbors, France and Poland. The population density is greatest in the traditional industrial areas of the Ruhr and parts of the Saar, the commercial centers of Cologne/Düsseldorf, the Rhine-Main area of Frankfurt / Wiesbaden, Berlin, and on a smaller scale in and around the other larger cities. Few areas can be described as under-populated. There Is no significant tendency on the part of the population to emigrate, although all residents are free to do so and to take all their assets with them.

German Population and Social Patterns

The German population is currently estimated at 82m. A full census has not been taken since 1987 (1981 in the eastern part of the country), and population trends since have been based on estimates supported by a continual micro-census. The next full census is planned for 2011 as part of an EU-wide project. In contrast to other western European countries, the population has risen over the past decade due to immigration, which up to now has generally more than compensated for the excess of deaths over live births.

However, this trend has now ceased and the general assumption is that of a long-term movement towards a reduced and aging population: official estimates suggest that the population will fall to between 65 and 70 million by 2060 – depending on immigration levels. Germany is more densely populated than either of her two largest neighbors, France and Poland. The population density is greatest in the traditional industrial areas of the Ruhr and parts of the Saar, the commercial centers of Cologne/Düsseldorf, the Rhine-Main area of Frankfurt / Wiesbaden, Berlin, and on a smaller scale in and around the other larger cities. Few areas can be described as under-populated. There Is no significant tendency on the part of the population to emigrate, although all residents are free to do so and to take all their assets with them.

German Political System

The constitutional form is the Federal Republic of Germany {Bundesrepublik Deutschland). Sixteen provinces {Länder) form the federation implied by the name. Each level of government (federation, province, district, and local community) is directed by an elected body competent to take decisions on all matters remitted to it by the constitution. Berlin is the capital. It is the home of both chambers of the federal parliament and of most government ministries. Other ministries and government authorities are located in various German towns, particularly in Bonn, the former West German capital.